Tuesday, December 08, 2015

The Big Dig

I'm still digging through the layers in my sewing room and have just finished sifting through the layers left during the Paleozoic age.  I can't wait to see what I dig up from the Proterozoic age.  They had some good fabric back then!

This was today's interesting find:


I'm not sure when I bought these, but I do know that I bought them to make a gift for a certain person.  She doesn't use a computer so we can safely talk about her and her gift here.

Has anyone used these?  Can you offer advice?  Did you use a solid piece of fabric?  Did you piece the placemats?  Did you use a (gag) bias binding?  Any helpful hints?  I would like to give these as a Christmas present.  Yes, this Christmas.


7 comments:

Doreen Auger said...

I haven't ever seen these! I would imagine that any quilting done would be awesome for texture and, yes, bias binding would be involved. You can do it......trust me......I did it yesterday!!!!! LOL!!!!!

Linda R said...

I have them too - picked them up at one of the quilt shows - wondered about binding them off etc etc ;-)Iwas thinking of making a pattern from it ( adding seam allowance) sewing two different fabrics together, turning them etc etc and then after ironing it down do topstitching along the edge and then another band an inch in from the first round so that I wouldnt have to do any binding lol..or perhaps follow the instructions on it and then do a fancy machine stitch all around the edge without needing binding at all ( which was the whole purpose of buying these supposed to be quick and easy ) ;)

Sandra said...

You could piece both sides and then use satin stitch to do the edge. Terry Grant has a tutorial on her blog about finishing a quilt that way. You could also look for tutorials on making fabric postcards for more info. good luck

Barb said...

I just used the oval ones to make fall placemats for Thanksgiving. Be sure to use steam when ironing the fabric to the placemat form, it seems to hold better. I trimmed the fabric after ironing it on. Yes, I did bias binding and hand stitched the back!

Marsha Hodgkins said...

While I realize these were made to fuse down the fabric, I would be tempted to do a quilt as you go technique to get some great texture in the placemat without having to cut, steam, cut, steam and then have to quilt the whole thing. I might try button-hole stitching around the edge or satin-stitching depending on how thick they are. Good luck and hope your lucky friend enjoys them.

Laurel Strand said...

What's wrong with bias binding?

debby said...

I am what is wrong with bias binding. I'm not very good at it.